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The former Procter & Gamble marketing star is now CEO of Assurex, which hopes to revolutionize patient care with its new cutting-edge diagnostic tool GeneSight

Gina Drosos
 

It’s early evening with the first frisson of football weather, and as the sun fades in the distance Gina Drosos and her family are playing cornhole. An uncle lays out barbecued ribs and chopped pork takeout, and although son Will, 18, is warned he can’t wear it for his senior high school portrait, he is sporting a Dawgs T-shirt. Gina’s iPhone, clad in a UGA cover, occasionally vibrates, and 16-year-old daughter Claire sips from a UGA cup. Just so no one mistakes where the Drososes’ loyalties lie, husband Perry brings out the UGA football jersey and cheerleader outfits (complete with bandanas) they’ve bought for their frisky mini-Labradoodle Chai and mini-Goldendoodle Zooey.

Tailgating in the Classic City before a game Between the Hedges? Nope. It’s just another Sunday evening get-together at the Drosos home in suburban Cincinnati, where Gina’s connection to her alma mater is inescapable. The two-time Fortune 50 Most Powerful Women in Business, often dubbed “Beauty Queen” for her role in revitalizing iconic cosmetic labels like Olay and Cover Girl has traveled all over the world for Cincinnati-based giant Procter & Gamble, where she led a unit with more than 20 brands and $6 billion in sales. Her 6,000-plus employees spanned 120 countries; her strategies for Olay alone helped boost sales from $200 million to $2.5 billion.