Published

Net Impact, a nationwide nonprofit that encourages MBA students to use b-school skills for sustainable and environmental causes, profiled Terry College’s MBA program in its guide 2013 guide to innovative schools.

The guide, Business as UNusual: The Student Guide to Graduate Programs, details more than 100 MBA programs, using information culled from student surveys. It weighs schools’ social and environmental curricula, student activities and career services as factors for inclusion.

“The University of Georgia is an unparalleled value, especially for strong applicants, as the top 30 percent of applicants are offered graduate assistantship positions, which include a tuition waiver and monthly stipend,” the guide states. “UGA’s small program size provides a close-knit community for students. The culture is highly collaborative and students are extremely supportive of each other as they develop key business skills and pursue new career opportunities. There is a cohort of students who are extremely passionate about improving the world through business. Students aspiring to work in an impact role are given the resources and development necessary to reach their goals.”

Net Impact claims that business schools operate in students’ market, where institutions compete for the best students by offering courses and curricula designed around student wants. And many of those students want an education that incorporates environmental and social programs.

“More than 3,300 graduate students shared their perspectives on their schools in this year’s Business as Unusual Guide, and it’s clear that addressing social and environmental themes have become student ‘must-haves’ in competitive MBA curricula,” said Liz Maw, CEO of Net Impact. “Students who are passionate about making an impact are demanding a new kind of education, one that allows them to use their career within and beyond business to tackle the toughest problems of our time.”

The profile comes on the heels of Terry’s Net Impact chapter earning gold status, an honor given to only 24 percent of the more than 300 chapters worldwide.