Published

Dean Benajamin C. Ayers

With two of the three phases of construction now complete, we have reached the tipping point where the Business Learning Community at the corner of Lumpkin and Baxter streets truly is the new home of the Terry College of Business. This summer the college’s senior administration will move into their new offices in Correll Hall and our faculty will settle into their new offices in Amos Hall, Benson Hall and Moore-Rooker Hall. When classes begin, we will realize our long-held dream — once and for all — of a business school that facilitates our day-to-day experience as a community of students, faculty, staff and alumni.

For the students who graduated this spring, we concluded a great year of academic achievement and thrilling contest wins. We celebrated our third Rhodes Scholar since 2008, witnessed tremendous growth of our Terry Women’s Initiative and Entrepreneurship Program, and cheered an impressive run of case competition victories by our MBA and MAcc programs.

Next year will see the full launch of another ambitious University of Georgia initiative that will give our students a competitive advantage after graduation. It’s called the UGA Advantage, but many of us call it by its nickname: Double Dawgs. We believe it will significantly enhance the opportunities for students motivated to earn a graduate degree.

Many of our alumni are already familiar with the Double Dawgs concept if they or their classmates completed the five-year BBA/MAcc program in the Tull School of Accounting. Students are able to take courses that count toward a graduate degree while pursuing their bachelor’s degree. The UGA Advantage is going to dramatically expand the pathways to dual degrees and make them viable options for more students. We also will offer more dual degree programs that provide an interdisciplinary experience, whether it is two programs within one college or two programs in two different colleges. For instance, Terry College is already partnering with the College of Engineering on a five-year BS/MBA program for students majoring in any of eight undergraduate engineering programs. A dual degree in economics (AB/MA or BBA/MA) is now offered, and we plan to add a consulting track to the Master of Accountancy for non-accounting majors. Other options we are exploring include an MS in Business Analytics that will be a draw for non-business majors, and a master’s in information systems security.

It is our hope and belief that these streamlined dual degree programs will not only expand the opportunities for our students but also deepen and diversify what our graduates can offer employers when they enter the workplace.

Sincerely,
Benjamin C. Ayers, Dean
Earl Davis Chair in Taxation